Life In Mexico

5 Reasons that THIS is the Perfect Summer Blouse

chic mexican folk blouse

These blouses are amazing, especially as we’re heading in to the steamy days of summer.  They are deliciously made by hand, created by the talented weavers of southern Mexico and best of all – they’re BEAUTIFUL.  They come in tons of fun candy colors and also just simple classic classy white.

  1. These blouses are handmade in the truest sense of the word.  The artisan starts with a glorious pile of threads and turns those magnificent threads into this blouse.  All the while adding in the small design detail and brocading their unique signature into the blouse.
  2. This is slow fashion.  This blouse wasn’t cranked out in a factory in Asia.  No, this blouse took over a week to create using a technique that dates back to the Mayan period.
  3. This is ethical fashion.  Only local materials are used – not because it’s a trend. No, just because that’s how things are done in rural Chiapas.  Further, not only is the artisan paid a fair wage for her work, she also works from the comfort of her home, near her family.
  4. This blouse looks great on ALL body types.  Are you square shaped?  No problem, in fact, so is the blouse.  Are you a little wide through the shoulders?  No, problem, the blouse will look great on you.  Have a bit of a tummy?  Don’t worry, this blouse flows great on all body types.
  5. Support rural artisans.  Yep, you can also feel good about purchasing a blouse like this.  You contributed to the continuation of a cultural tradition, to the economic development of a community, and to the support of women artisans.
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Travels to Pantelhó, Chiapas

Coming soon – a full trip report on our visit to the textile artisans of Pantelhó. A village at the end of a very long windy, sometimes treacherous, road. Looking forward to sharing the beautiful pictures of the artisans and their works and, of course, tales of our trip with our community.

Life In Mexico

Travels to Pantelhó, Chiapas

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Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas, Life In Mexico

Entertaining Guests in Chiapas

We haven’t written in awhile because we had temporarily turned into a bed and breakfast for my family and friends from the US. We crammed a lot of Chiapas travel into a short amount of time.  We kept saying “We’ll do that next time”, and by the end of the trip, my family decided they needed to come another 2 times in order to fit in everything we didn’t get to do.  

Here’s a quick rundown of some things we did and saw with our foreign guests:

Palenque Ruins – we went to Palenque on two separate occasions and in two very different ways.  With my friend, we took a one day tour from Tuxtla to Palenque.  We left at 5 am and returned at 11 pm the same night.  It was a rough trip, but we managed to see the Chiapas countryside, the ruins, and two different waterfalls.  The downside is the group tour atmosphere, the forced feeding at certain restaurants, the schedules, etc.  

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We did a separate trip with my family to Palenque.  My dad is getting a bit older, recently had hip surgery, and so I didn’t think 18 hours in a bus would be good for him.  Instead, we rented a car and drove to Palenque.  It was a glorious way to visit the ruins.  We stopped in little villages along the way, bought from the vendors selling on the highway, and didn’t have to worry about our liquid consumption because we could stop for the toilet when we needed.  We stayed the night in Palenque at a super cute hotel called “Hotel Chablis”.  We liked it very much – it was a great value.  Renting a mini-van for 6 people to get to Palenque wasn’t cheap, but it was less expensive than the tour for six people and the freedom to travel priceless.

 

Sumidero Canon:  We also visited the Canon twice – once with my friend and again with my family.  The two trips didn’t differ much except for the amount of wildlife we saw on the second trip.  With my family, we saw spider monkeys, multiple crocodiles, and lots of birds unidentifiable to me.  With my friend, we saw two crocodiles and some birds.  Each time we used a tour operator found on the malecon in Chiapa de Corzo.  The price both times was 160 pesos per person.  

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Las Pichanchas:  We take everyone here when they come to visit.  It’s in all the guide books and there’s a reason why.  It’s a pretty cool place.  The food is great and you get the opportunity to try the regional dishes of Mexico.  The costumes and dancing are fantastic – if you couldn’t make it to the Feria of Chiapa de Corzo in January, you can still get your fill of the cool parachicos at the restaurant.  Love love love this place.  

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